Read Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu (SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture) by Alan Kam-Leung Chan Online

two-visions-of-the-way-a-study-of-the-wang-pi-and-the-ho-shang-kung-commentaries-on-the-lao-tzu-suny-series-in-chinese-philosophy-and-culture

Book by Chan, Alan Kam Leung...

Title : Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu (SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture)
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 0791404560
Format Type : Paperback
Language : English
Publisher : State University of New York Press January 22, 1991
Number of Pages : 314 pages
File Size : 763 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Two Visions of the Way: A Study of the Wang Pi and the Ho-Shang Kung Commentaries on the Lao-Tzu (SUNY Series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture) Reviews

  • David T. Yu
    2019-05-10 21:01

    This is a very good book if you have already studied Tao Te Ching in its originals and have thought about it for a long time. It is also written for those who have read the Wang Pi and Ho-Shang Kung annotations in their originals, and have those books at your finger tips. It is not a substitute for those who have not read any of the above in Chinese, and do not have a good understanding of Chinese history and Chinese philosophy. The author provides a very good summary of the interpretations by Want Pi and Ho-Shang Kung. He provides a good jumping board for readers to generate their own interpretations. Ultimately, this is what those books are about. They are not data, but concepts.

  • Avery
    2019-04-28 21:10

    This is one of those obnoxious modern studies that is more interested in social context than translation. There is a lot of useful background information about when and why commentaries got written, but the sections of translation are totally out of order and with lengthy subcommentaries. The object is not to present the original texts, but to let the reader know what the author thinks of them. It is a common scholarly sin -- I am guilty of it as well. But in this case, when the Ho-Shang Kung translation is not readily available elsewhere, I find it especially egregious.